Mason Jar Magazine

Buy local. Eat local. Play local in southern, middle Tennessee

Spring Snaps: 3 Local Locations for Capturing That Perfect Seasonal Shot

The author took this image on Motlow Barns Road in Lynchburg using the Hipstamatic app.

Smart phone images have evolved from the flip phone days. Today’s higher megapixel images elevate your snapshots to iArt … especially with the addition of special add on lens and editing filters.

However, smartphones aren’t as powerful as DSLRs and lack the manual controls that let you achieve shallow depth of field. They also aren’t great at capturing subjects in motion. Great composition is the key to smartphone snaps that stand out on social media and with a little editing, some are even worthy of hanging in your home.

Composition begins with an interesting background. That’s what makes the blue skies, green grass, and budding flowers of spring a great starting point for amateur photogs.

Here are three great locations in and around southern, middle Tennessee for next-level spring photographs.

Cheekwood in Bloom – This 55-acre botanical garden located just outside of Nashville offers picturesque backdrops year-round, but each March, they launch Cheekwood in Bloom – a celebration of all things spring. During cooler temps, Cheekwood gardeners plant over 100,000 bulbs including snowdrops, crocus, hyacinths, and daffodils. The grounds are also filled with magnolias, redbuds, and dogwoods that bloom as the weather warms. For more information, including pricing and hours, click here.

Historic Bell Buckle – Not only does the City of Bell Buckle begin to burst with hundreds of daffodils each spring, their historic downtown area offers tons of photo ops. From the painted murals to historic downtown sidewalks to tree-lined streets, this charming southern, middle Tennessee hamlet makes a prolific landscape for a little photography tourism. If you arrive around March 17, you’ll also get a front row seat to the annual Daffodil Day. Click here for more information.

Moore County Back Roads – The winding roads and rolling hills of Metro Moore County (home of the Jack Daniel Distillery) offers lots of opportunities for some classic, rural photography. Highway 55 leads into the tiny, historic town and almost any scenic route off that main road will lead you to a plethora of subjects like friendly cows, historic barns, picturesque fence rows, abandoned structures, charming creeks, and rural bridges. If you’re interested in capturing the spirit of the area, you can easily capture a whiskey warehouse in the background.  There’s also Tims Ford Lake and the nearby Elk River not to mention the historic Lynchburg Square.

Mixtiles mounts your image on lightweight 8×8 foam core. They can easily be hung as wall art without damaging walls. They’re also easily interchangeable.

How to Make the Most of Your Images

Many smartphone savvy photographers use Mixtiles to create beautiful, interchangeable, mixable smartphone prints. Through their app, user may purchase 8×8 photos mounted to one-inch foam core. The pieces are light weight and affix easily to walls without damaging them. Your first order must be a minimum of three tiles for $49. After that, each tile ordered is just $9 each. To learn more visit their website.

Hipstamatic remains one of the coolest iPhone photography apps on the market. Users purchase individual lens, film, and flash filters that can be combined in near endless possibilities. Images shot with Hipstamatic often give that old-school analog feel. There’s also a pro mode for more precise images. Hipstamatic shoots images in the 4:4 ratio making them perfect for Instagram. In 2010, New York Times photographer Damon Winter used the app to illustrate a front-page story about the Afghanistan War. Hipstamatic also allows user to order prints directly from the app. Nine 4×4 prints are just $5.99. To learn more, check out their website. •

{Author’s Note: The cow images was shot with Hipstamatic. The barn images was shot with the normal iPhone lens and then edited in the iPhone app AfterFocus. Both were shot in Moore County.}

{Mason Jar Magazine covers food, dining, arts, culture, events, attractions, music, books, film, and recreation in a cluster of 18 small towns in southern, middle Tennessee including Bell Buckle, Belvidere, Cowan, Decherd, Estill Springs, Fayetteville, Huntland, Kelso, Lynchburg, Manchester, Monteagle, Mulberry, Normandy, Tullahoma, Sewanee, Shelbyville, Wartrace, and Winchester plus the best of what’s happening in Huntsville, Murfreesboro, Chattanooga, and Nashville.}

Written by: Tabitha D. Moore, Mason Jar Magazine, Editor

{Mason Jar Magazine covers food, dining, arts, culture, events, attractions, music, books, film, and recreation in a cluster of 18 small towns in southern, middle Tennessee including Bell Buckle, Belvidere, Cowan, Decherd, Estill Springs, Fayetteville, Huntland, Kelso, Lynchburg, Manchester, Monteagle, Mulberry, Normandy, Tullahoma, Sewanee, Shelbyville, Wartrace, and Winchester plus the best of what’s happening in Huntsville, Murfreesboro, Chattanooga, and Nashville.}

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